Penn Calendar Penn A-Z School of Arts and Sciences University of Pennsylvania

Shoumitro Chatterjee

Shoumitro Chatterjee is a Postdoctoral Research Scholar at the Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge, UK. In Fall 2019, he will be an Assistant Professor of Economics at the Pennsylvania State University. He received his Ph.D. in Economics from Princeton University in 2018.

(Re)presenting Indian Women Outside India

Ravinder Kaur
Monday, June 18, 2018

Indian historians have expended much labor and analytical acumen in deconstructing the colonial construction of Indian women and gender relations in India. The British had highlighted the “low status” of Indian women by citing cultural practices such as purdah (veiling), sati (widow immolation), child marriage and dowry, not to mention female infanticide. Since then, these practices began to metonymically represent Indian women to the outside world as being subjugated and lacking any rights or agency of their own.

Rethinking the Developmental Capacities of the Indian State

Adnan Naseemullah
Monday, June 4, 2018

Narendra Modi’s election, now four years ago, brought tremendous optimism to many observers of the Indian economy. Finally, the man who many thought had achieved economic miracles in Gujarat would govern India with similar discipline, encouraging both domestic and foreign investment and thus unleashing the full potential of the market to drive India’s economic transformation. Four years later, however, Modi’s project of governance reform has stalled.

Field Administration in India: A Creaking Foundation

Rashmi Sharma
Monday, May 21, 2018

After the general elections in 2014, a newly ambitious India appeared to emerge: a manufacturing hub with clean cities and villages, where farmer incomes would double and everyone would have houses and bank accounts. Assumed in this vision, though never articulated, was an effective government apparatus converting these ideas into concrete reality.

How Bureaucracies Benefit from Political Patronage in Distribution of Public Services

Tanushree Bhan
Monday, May 7, 2018

The year 2018 started on a somber note when reports of Cape Town running out of public water supplies shook the global news cycle. A little-known fact that did not get much attention in popular media was that for a quarter of the city’s residents living in informal settlements, “Day Zero” has long been part of everyday life. As scientists have begun to count down this looming crisis in other major cities, especially in the developing world, the socio-political implications of inequitable access to basic need services have become exigent.